Category: e-Reader Reviews

Kindle Fire HD in Canada – First Impressions

Today the Kindle Fire launched in multiple countries including Canada, and one was delivered to my door for your reviewing pleasure.

My initial impression is that, although the device is nice, for Canadians it is still very, very limited.  It is a lovely device, but the Amazon services which distinguish it from the other tablets out there are sadly missing.

There is still no support for Amazon’s music or movie store or Amazon Instant Video for Canada.  iTunes movies will not play on the Kindle Fire due to DRM.  Through the movies for Flixter though you can view any movies you have on your UV account.  They do not have the cool X-Ray for Movies feature that gives you details of the actors in a movie when you hit pause.

For the last few years, iTunes music has been sold without DRM so can easily be copied to the music folder and will be available in the music section of the Kindle Fire.

For me, personally, I was very disappointed that the Audible integration is missing for Canadians.  The whole Audiobooks section is missing from the top menu, and although Whispersync for Voice continues to work, immersion reading is not available.  Audible advised me that right now, this feature is for US-only. It hopes to expand to Canada in the future, but no ETA yet. 

As with the Nexus 7, the Kindle is not recognised by Adobe Digital Editions on the Mac, making transferring epub books to the device very difficult.  I have not yet tried the Overdrive app on the Kindle to try to borrow library books.

On the positive side, the device feels solid in my hands, I found it responsive and I did like the ease of shopping on it.  I’m not certain I could consider it a full tablet – lack of multitasking, decent organizational system – it’s definitely more of a multimedia Kindle, but what it does it does very well.

At this point, I’m not certain if I’ll keep it – the lack of Audible integration is a real blow to me, but I will work with it over the next week or so to see what I think.

 

Kindle Fire HD in Canada – First Impressions

Today the Kindle Fire launched in multiple countries including Canada, and one was delivered to my door for your reviewing pleasure.

My initial impression is that, although the device is nice, for Canadians it is still very, very limited.  It is a lovely device, but the Amazon services which distinguish it from the other tablets out there are sadly missing.

There is still no support for Amazon’s music or movie store or Amazon Instant Video for Canada.  iTunes movies will not play on the Kindle Fire due to DRM.  Through the movies for Flixter though you can view any movies you have on your UV account.  They do not have the cool X-Ray for Movies feature that gives you details of the actors in a movie when you hit pause.

For the last few years, iTunes music has been sold without DRM so can easily be copied to the music folder and will be available in the music section of the Kindle Fire.

For me, personally, I was very disappointed that the Audible integration is missing for Canadians.  The whole Audiobooks section is missing from the top menu, and although Whispersync for Voice continues to work, immersion reading is not available.  Audible advised me that right now, this feature is for US-only. It hopes to expand to Canada in the future, but no ETA yet. 

As with the Nexus 7, the Kindle is not recognised by Adobe Digital Editions on the Mac, making transferring epub books to the device very difficult.  I have not yet tried the Overdrive app on the Kindle to try to borrow library books.

On the positive side, the device feels solid in my hands, I found it responsive and I did like the ease of shopping on it.  I’m not certain I could consider it a full tablet – lack of multitasking, decent organizational system – it’s definitely more of a multimedia Kindle, but what it does it does very well.

At this point, I’m not certain if I’ll keep it – the lack of Audible integration is a real blow to me, but I will work with it over the next week or so to see what I think.

 

A Newbie’s Guide to eReading

Ereading still causes a lot of confusion.  I thought it might be useful to put together a post of some common questions regarding ereading and to do my best to answer them.

What is eReading?
Simply put, ereading is reading a book, comic, magazine or other similar content on an electronic device rather than in hard copy.

Why should I give up my paperback and switch to ereading?
Like many things, ereading is not an either/or activity.  There is no reason why you cannot read books in both hard copy and ebook formats.  It is very much a personal choice.

Having said that, there are pros and cons to ereading.  I have listed some here to help you decide if ereading is right for you.

Pros:
Convenience
.  With ereading you can carry your entire library around with you on your eReader, smartphone or tablet.   Can you imagine carrying around all 14 hardback books in the Wheel of Time series?  With ereading that is no issue. Likewise, if you’re living in a small space, an ereader takes up much less room than forty shelves of books.

Accessibility.  Most ereaders and ereading applications allow you to adjust the font size to suit your eyesight.  This is a real lifesaver if your eyesight isn’t what it was.

Never lose your place.  Most eReaders and devices keep your place for you, and some automatically synchronise over multiple devices.  Amazon even synchronises between the Amazon Kindle ebook and the Audible audiobook.

Additional cool features.  eReading gives you lots of extra features.  These range from such inbuilt dictionaries (if you’re unsure of the meaning of a word, click or tap on it and the definition will pop up) to additional background information and references and social sharing of your reading.

24-hour bookstore.  Imagine the scenario.  You finish a real page turner of a book at 2am and you really can’t wait to see what happens next.  With eReading, a few clicks later you can be reading the sequel, often by 2.01am.  Also, if you’re anxiously waiting for that hot, new release by your favourite author, most new release books are released at 12am PST (in Canada) and delivered automatically to your device at that time if you pre-order.  Of course, if you’re trying to watch your book budget, that Buy Now button can be more of a con…

Millions of free books.  That’s correct.  Thanks to efforts like Project Gutenberg, there are millions of legally available free ebooks for your ereading pleasure.   

Free ebooks on Amazon
Free ebooks on Kobo 
Free ebooks on Sony 

Your books are backed up by the store.  If anything happens to your eReader, you can rest assured that you have not lost your entire library.  Simply log back into the store and redownload them.

Cons;
You’re renting not buying.  When you “buy” an ebook, you’re actually buying a licence to read that ebook on your devices, not an actual ebook.  This means that, in theory, it’s easier to lose access to your entire library if, say, your ebook provider goes out of business.

Read eBooks cannot be resold, donated or regifted.  Linked to the above, the licence you buy cannot be resold, donated or regifted to another person, at least not at this point.  This may be a deal breaker for some of you who like to share your reading material with others.  Amazon Kindle customers in the United States do have limited options to lend Kindle books to others, but this is highly restricted by the publishers and usually allows only one loan per ebook, and on very select titles.

DRM is a pain in the neck.  DRM – or digital rights management –  is software applied to ebooks to prevent your illegally sharing them or changing their format.  It locks the ebook to a specific format and sometimes account and device.  It means, for example, that you cannot read a Kindle book on a Kobo eReader and vice versa.  There is no way to legally convert the ebook to make this possible.  

eReaders and devices are more fragile than paperbacks.  If you drop a paperback in the bath, you’re only out $7 or so.  That cost is considerably more if you drop your eReader…

These are what I see as the pros and cons.  It is really your personal preference if any of these are deallbreakers for you.

I like to borrow my books from a library.  I can’t do that with eBooks, can I?
Certainly you can!  Let me refer you to my post on borrowing eBooks.

I need a specialised eReader, don’t I?
Not at all.  If you have a computer, smartphone or tablet you can get started on eReading.  You would need to download an application.  Many are linked to a specific eBook store.  Here are some of the most popular.

AmazonKoboSonyBarnes & NobleApple

There are other, more general applications, but if you are new to eReading, I would recommend you begin with one of the major providers.

You may also prefer to start off with a free application to see if ereading is for you before investing in a dedicated eReader.

OK, I’m interested.  How do I get started with eReading?
Excellent!  The first thing you would need to do is choose an ebook provider.  I would recommend you try some of the free ebooks from one or two providers to see which one best suits your needs and is best for you.  

Here are links to the main stores (for Canada):

AmazonKoboSony 

In each case the steps are very much the same.

  1. go to the site for your preferred ebook store
  2. register for an account if you don’t already have one (look for a sign in or register link)
  3. download the application for your computer, smartphone and/or tablet
  4. sign in to the application with the store account
  5. browse the store for a book you’d like to buy
  6. add to cart and go through the payment process.  
  7. in the ereading application look for a “sync” function to have the book downloaded to the application if it doesn’t appear there automatically

And there you have it – your first ebook.  Congratulations!

Which dedicated eReader should I go for?
This is a very personal decision.  It really depends on what you want and what is important to you.  Please check out my eReader reviews for some suggestions or please feel free to get in touch with me if you have more specific questions. 

 

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A Newbie’s Guide to eReading

Ereading still causes a lot of confusion.  I thought it might be useful to put together a post of some common questions regarding ereading and to do my best to answer them.

What is eReading?
Simply put, ereading is reading a book, comic, magazine or other similar content on an electronic device rather than in hard copy.

Why should I give up my paperback and switch to ereading?
Like many things, ereading is not an either/or activity.  There is no reason why you cannot read books in both hard copy and ebook formats.  It is very much a personal choice.

Having said that, there are pros and cons to ereading.  I have listed some here to help you decide if ereading is right for you.

Pros:
Convenience
.  With ereading you can carry your entire library around with you on your eReader, smartphone or tablet.   Can you imagine carrying around all 14 hardback books in the Wheel of Time series?  With ereading that is no issue. Likewise, if you’re living in a small space, an ereader takes up much less room than forty shelves of books.

Accessibility.  Most ereaders and ereading applications allow you to adjust the font size to suit your eyesight.  This is a real lifesaver if your eyesight isn’t what it was.

Never lose your place.  Most eReaders and devices keep your place for you, and some automatically synchronise over multiple devices.  Amazon even synchronises between the Amazon Kindle ebook and the Audible audiobook.

Additional cool features.  eReading gives you lots of extra features.  These range from such inbuilt dictionaries (if you’re unsure of the meaning of a word, click or tap on it and the definition will pop up) to additional background information and references and social sharing of your reading.

24-hour bookstore.  Imagine the scenario.  You finish a real page turner of a book at 2am and you really can’t wait to see what happens next.  With eReading, a few clicks later you can be reading the sequel, often by 2.01am.  Also, if you’re anxiously waiting for that hot, new release by your favourite author, most new release books are released at 12am PST (in Canada) and delivered automatically to your device at that time if you pre-order.  Of course, if you’re trying to watch your book budget, that Buy Now button can be more of a con…

Millions of free books.  That’s correct.  Thanks to efforts like Project Gutenberg, there are millions of legally available free ebooks for your ereading pleasure.   

Free ebooks on Amazon
Free ebooks on Kobo 
Free ebooks on Sony 

Your books are backed up by the store.  If anything happens to your eReader, you can rest assured that you have not lost your entire library.  Simply log back into the store and redownload them.

Cons;
You’re renting not buying.  When you “buy” an ebook, you’re actually buying a licence to read that ebook on your devices, not an actual ebook.  This means that, in theory, it’s easier to lose access to your entire library if, say, your ebook provider goes out of business.

Read eBooks cannot be resold, donated or regifted.  Linked to the above, the licence you buy cannot be resold, donated or regifted to another person, at least not at this point.  This may be a deal breaker for some of you who like to share your reading material with others.  Amazon Kindle customers in the United States do have limited options to lend Kindle books to others, but this is highly restricted by the publishers and usually allows only one loan per ebook, and on very select titles.

DRM is a pain in the neck.  DRM – or digital rights management –  is software applied to ebooks to prevent your illegally sharing them or changing their format.  It locks the ebook to a specific format and sometimes account and device.  It means, for example, that you cannot read a Kindle book on a Kobo eReader and vice versa.  There is no way to legally convert the ebook to make this possible.  

eReaders and devices are more fragile than paperbacks.  If you drop a paperback in the bath, you’re only out $7 or so.  That cost is considerably more if you drop your eReader…

These are what I see as the pros and cons.  It is really your personal preference if any of these are deallbreakers for you.

I like to borrow my books from a library.  I can’t do that with eBooks, can I?
Certainly you can!  Let me refer you to my post on borrowing eBooks.

I need a specialised eReader, don’t I?
Not at all.  If you have a computer, smartphone or tablet you can get started on eReading.  You would need to download an application.  Many are linked to a specific eBook store.  Here are some of the most popular.

AmazonKoboSonyBarnes & NobleApple

There are other, more general applications, but if you are new to eReading, I would recommend you begin with one of the major providers.

You may also prefer to start off with a free application to see if ereading is for you before investing in a dedicated eReader.

OK, I’m interested.  How do I get started with eReading?
Excellent!  The first thing you would need to do is choose an ebook provider.  I would recommend you try some of the free ebooks from one or two providers to see which one best suits your needs and is best for you.  

Here are links to the main stores (for Canada):

AmazonKoboSony 

In each case the steps are very much the same.

  1. go to the site for your preferred ebook store
  2. register for an account if you don’t already have one (look for a sign in or register link)
  3. download the application for your computer, smartphone and/or tablet
  4. sign in to the application with the store account
  5. browse the store for a book you’d like to buy
  6. add to cart and go through the payment process.  
  7. in the ereading application look for a “sync” function to have the book downloaded to the application if it doesn’t appear there automatically

And there you have it – your first ebook.  Congratulations!

Which dedicated eReader should I go for?
This is a very personal decision.  It really depends on what you want and what is important to you.  Please check out my eReader reviews for some suggestions or please feel free to get in touch with me if you have more specific questions. 

 

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Kobo Aura – Review

The Kobo Aura is the new premium ereader from Kobo. It is marketed as follows:

The eReader, Re-Imagined.

Kobo Aura HD is the only premium eReader, offering an unprecedented immersive reading experience for the book lover. Unlike other eReaders, Kobo Aura HD elevates the reading experience by combining the most advanced, highest resolution, extra-large screen with a book-inspired design that feels natural and comfortable to hold.

The Aura is an eInk reader with a 6.8 HD backlit screen. Comparing its specs with those of the Kobo Glo and the Kindle Paperwhite we see the following:

Kobo Aura
6.8″ Custom WXGA+ Pearl E Ink Screen
ClarityScreen+: 265 dpi, 1440 x 1080 resolution
240 g (8.4658 oz)
1 GHz; 20% faster processor than other leading eReaders
4GB internal storage

Kobo Glo
6″ XGA Pearl E Ink touchscreen; 1024×758 resolution; 16-level grey scale
185 g (6.5 oz)
1 GHz
2GB internal storage

Kindle Paperwhite
212 ppi, optimized font technology, 16-level gray scale
7.5 ounces (213 grams)
2GB internal storage

So, the main improvements you get for an extra $40 is the larger screen – 6.8 inches compared to 6 inches and higher resolution. Kobo has also made a change to the standard padded backing of the Kobo line. Here are some photos to show the comparison.

Kobo Aura vs Kobo Glo
IMG_0822

Kobo Aura vs Kindle Paperwhite
IMG_0823

Shaped back of Kobo Aura
IMG_0824

Thickness comparison
IMG_0835

Now, it has to be said, the screen on the Kobo Aura is gorgeous. I’d say it is slightly better than the screen on the Paperwhite, and better than the Kobo. The lighting I’d say is considerably superior to both the Paperwhite and the Glo.

The OS has been updated on the Kobo Aura so that more info is displayed on the home screen; rather than the four books you’re currently reading and links to other content, the Aura shows new reading rewards, recently added books, and recommendations. I liked this and hope it will come to the Glo soon.

Now, personally, I’m not so fond of the Aura’s larger screen and waved back. I love that my ereader fits easily in my handbag, and I like the 6 inch form factor. The weight is not a big difference, although I don’t have a cover on my Aura right now. That being said, I tend to read epub format books, primarily novels, and not PDFs. For those of you who read a lot of PDFs or comics on your ereader, the larger screen may be a worthwhile investment.

I should also like to comment on battery life. I found I had to recharge it after just four days. In all fairness, I was off work sick so I was reading for a solid eight hours over those four days, and I had the light on. This matches up with Kobo’s claim of two months at 30 minutes a day. I cannot believe though that a hard core reader (as you’d have to be to invest in the Aura) would only read 30 minutes a day. That’s something to bear in mind.

The processor in the Aura and Glo are both 1Ghz, so I found no discernible difference in page turn speed. It has double the internal storage of the Glo or Paperwhite, which might be useful for those using it for large PDF files.

In summary, the Aura is a nice reader; I’m not certain that it justifies an extra $40 over the Glo, especially for me as the Kobo is my secondary ereader – my primary ereader is my Kindle. I’m still undecided whether to keep the Aura or return it. If this product were from Amazon and therefore the ereader I would use most often, I’d be more likely to keep it.

Clearly it’s targeting a readership who reads PDFs or comic books. If that is you, the Aura is certainly worth looking at. For those who read primarily epub novels, I personally don’t feel it brings much more to the table than the Kobo Glo or the Kindle Paperwhite.

Let me know what you think.

Kobo Aura HD 6.8 inch – Review

The Kobo Aura is the new premium ereader from Kobo. It is marketed as follows:

The eReader, Re-Imagined. Kobo Aura HD is the only premium eReader, offering an unprecedented immersive reading experience for the book lover. Unlike other eReaders, Kobo Aura HD elevates the reading experience by combining the most advanced, highest resolution, extra-large screen with a book-inspired design that feels natural and comfortable to hold.

The Aura is an eInk reader with a 6.8 HD backlit screen. Comparing its specs with those of the Kobo Glo and the Kindle Paperwhite we see the following:

Kobo Aura 6.8″ Custom WXGA+ Pearl E Ink Screen ClarityScreen+: 265 dpi, 1440 x 1080 resolution 240 g (8.4658 oz) 1 GHz; 20% faster processor than other leading eReaders 4GB internal storage

Kobo Glo 6″ XGA Pearl E Ink touchscreen; 1024×758 resolution; 16-level grey scale 185 g (6.5 oz) 1 GHz 2GB internal storage

Kindle Paperwhite 212 ppi, optimized font technology, 16-level gray scale 7.5 ounces (213 grams) 2GB internal storage

So, the main improvements you get for an extra $40 is the larger screen – 6.8 inches compared to 6 inches and higher resolution. Kobo has also made a change to the standard padded backing of the Kobo line. Here are some photos to show the comparison.

Kobo Aura vs Kobo Glo IMG_0822

Kobo Aura vs Kindle Paperwhite IMG_0823

Shaped back of Kobo Aura IMG_0824

Thickness comparison IMG_0835

Now, it has to be said, the screen on the Kobo Aura is gorgeous. I’d say it is slightly better than the screen on the Paperwhite, and better than the Kobo. The lighting I’d say is considerably superior to both the Paperwhite and the Glo.

The OS has been updated on the Kobo Aura so that more info is displayed on the home screen; rather than the four books you’re currently reading and links to other content, the Aura shows new reading rewards, recently added books, and recommendations. I liked this and hope it will come to the Glo soon.

Now, personally, I’m not so fond of the Aura’s larger screen and waved back. I love that my ereader fits easily in my handbag, and I like the 6 inch form factor. The weight is not a big difference, although I don’t have a cover on my Aura right now. That being said, I tend to read epub format books, primarily novels, and not PDFs. For those of you who read a lot of PDFs or comics on your ereader, the larger screen may be a worthwhile investment.

I should also like to comment on battery life. I found I had to recharge it after just four days. In all fairness, I was off work sick so I was reading for a solid eight hours over those four days, and I had the light on. This matches up with Kobo’s claim of two months at 30 minutes a day. I cannot believe though that a hard core reader (as you’d have to be to invest in the Aura) would only read 30 minutes a day. That’s something to bear in mind.

The processor in the Aura and Glo are both 1Ghz, so I found no discernible difference in page turn speed. It has double the internal storage of the Glo or Paperwhite, which might be useful for those using it for large PDF files.

In summary, the Aura is a nice reader; I’m not certain that it justifies an extra $40 over the Glo, especially for me as the Kobo is my secondary ereader – my primary ereader is my Kindle. I’m still undecided whether to keep the Aura or return it. If this product were from Amazon and therefore the ereader I would use most often, I’d be more likely to keep it.

Clearly it’s targeting a readership who reads PDFs or comic books. If that is you, the Aura is certainly worth looking at. For those who read primarily epub novels, I personally don’t feel it brings much more to the table than the Kobo Glo or the Kindle Paperwhite.

Let me know what you think.

Kobo Aura

Kobo Aura HD 6.8 inch – Review

The Kobo Aura is the new premium ereader from Kobo. It is marketed as follows:

The eReader, Re-Imagined. Kobo Aura HD is the only premium eReader, offering an unprecedented immersive reading experience for the book lover. Unlike other eReaders, Kobo Aura HD elevates the reading experience by combining the most advanced, highest resolution, extra-large screen with a book-inspired design that feels natural and comfortable to hold.

The Aura is an eInk reader with a 6.8 HD backlit screen. Comparing its specs with those of the Kobo Glo and the Kindle Paperwhite we see the following:

Kobo Aura 6.8″ Custom WXGA+ Pearl E Ink Screen ClarityScreen+: 265 dpi, 1440 x 1080 resolution 240 g (8.4658 oz) 1 GHz; 20% faster processor than other leading eReaders 4GB internal storage

Kobo Glo 6″ XGA Pearl E Ink touchscreen; 1024×758 resolution; 16-level grey scale 185 g (6.5 oz) 1 GHz 2GB internal storage

Kindle Paperwhite 212 ppi, optimized font technology, 16-level gray scale 7.5 ounces (213 grams) 2GB internal storage

So, the main improvements you get for an extra $40 is the larger screen – 6.8 inches compared to 6 inches and higher resolution. Kobo has also made a change to the standard padded backing of the Kobo line. Here are some photos to show the comparison.

Kobo Aura vs Kobo Glo IMG_0822

Kobo Aura vs Kindle Paperwhite IMG_0823

Shaped back of Kobo Aura IMG_0824

Thickness comparison IMG_0835

Now, it has to be said, the screen on the Kobo Aura is gorgeous. I’d say it is slightly better than the screen on the Paperwhite, and better than the Kobo. The lighting I’d say is considerably superior to both the Paperwhite and the Glo.

The OS has been updated on the Kobo Aura so that more info is displayed on the home screen; rather than the four books you’re currently reading and links to other content, the Aura shows new reading rewards, recently added books, and recommendations. I liked this and hope it will come to the Glo soon.

Now, personally, I’m not so fond of the Aura’s larger screen and waved back. I love that my ereader fits easily in my handbag, and I like the 6 inch form factor. The weight is not a big difference, although I don’t have a cover on my Aura right now. That being said, I tend to read epub format books, primarily novels, and not PDFs. For those of you who read a lot of PDFs or comics on your ereader, the larger screen may be a worthwhile investment.

I should also like to comment on battery life. I found I had to recharge it after just four days. In all fairness, I was off work sick so I was reading for a solid eight hours over those four days, and I had the light on. This matches up with Kobo’s claim of two months at 30 minutes a day. I cannot believe though that a hard core reader (as you’d have to be to invest in the Aura) would only read 30 minutes a day. That’s something to bear in mind.

The processor in the Aura and Glo are both 1Ghz, so I found no discernible difference in page turn speed. It has double the internal storage of the Glo or Paperwhite, which might be useful for those using it for large PDF files.

In summary, the Aura is a nice reader; I’m not certain that it justifies an extra $40 over the Glo, especially for me as the Kobo is my secondary ereader – my primary ereader is my Kindle. I’m still undecided whether to keep the Aura or return it. If this product were from Amazon and therefore the ereader I would use most often, I’d be more likely to keep it.

Clearly it’s targeting a readership who reads PDFs or comic books. If that is you, the Aura is certainly worth looking at. For those who read primarily epub novels, I personally don’t feel it brings much more to the table than the Kobo Glo or the Kindle Paperwhite.

Let me know what you think.

Kobo Aura

Kindle Paperwhite Review

So on my day off work this week I took a trip to Plattsburgh NY to purchase a Kindle Paperwhite. I’ve wanted one ever since Jeff Bezos presented the project launch back in early September, but they are not available to ship to Canada. I’ve been keeping an eye on Bestbuy.com for stock information and when they came in stock last week I decided to go ahead and purchase one.

The bad When I first got it home, my initial reaction was, well, it’s nice, but not overwhelmingly so. I had been keen to see the new UI, but was exceptionally frustrated to know that as I had the cheaper special offers version there was only room for THREE books on the home screen in the new Cover View. THREE!!! Three!!! The rest of the space is taken up by Amazon advertising. That is ridiculous. Fortunately a quick Google search helped somewhat. Hint:

From Home screen go to Settings -> Device Options -> Personalise Your Kindle and turn off Recommended Content. This will give you an extra three books on your home screen. Having said that, it is lovely to have book covers as a home screen rather than just lines of text.

In this iteration, Amazon has dropped the physical home button – presumably to save space. It has been replaced by a virtual home button at the top left of the screen. I assure you I didn’t realise how much I used that button until it disappeared. I really hope Amazon brings it back.

You should be aware that in this version of the Kindle, Amazon has dropped support for text to speech and audiobooks. This is not a deal breaker for me as I listen to my Audible content on my iPhone. However, if audio support is important to you, the Kindle Paperwhite is not for you.

It has also halved the storage capacity of the device from 4Gb to 2Gb. My free space has dropped from 2348Mb free on my Kindle Touch to 717Mb free on the Paperwhite. However as the average ebook is only about a quarter to half an Mb, I have enough room left for a while. On my Kobo Glo I have 1129 Mb left.

The good In my use of the device so far, the new capacitive touch screen is responsive, although currently page turns on the Kindle Touch and Kobo Glo are noticeably faster than on the new Kindle Paperwhite. The Paperwhite is currently busy indexing all my books, so I anticipate this will speed up significantly once this is completed.

As with all Kindle products, the setup was exceptionally easy. It found and connected to my home wifi network with no problem, and as soon as I entered my Amazon account details all my content was available to me.

I like the way they’ve separated Cloud content from Device content. As the storage space has been significantly reduced, it’s clear Amazon is pushing you to their Cloud. As I’m not yet nearing the limit of my device storage it’s not such a big deal for me.

The new “time to read” function is quite fun. The book I’m currently reading at the moment, Cephrael’s Hand by Melissa McPhail, doesn’t have chapter divisions, so it can’t tell me about the chapter, but it’s been interesting to see how much time I have left in the book. I haven’t finished it yet, so not sure how accurate it is at this point.

The frakking GORGEOUS The screen. What can I say about the screen? It is GORGEOUS. Here are two photos comparing it to the Kindle Touch and the Kobo Glo, although I don’t think they do it justice.

Kindle Touch vs Kindle Paperwhite Kindle Touch vs Kindle Paperwhite

Kobo Glo vs Kindle Paperwhite Kindle Paperwhite vs Kobo Glo

I have the light setting to 11 of 22 for moderate lighting conditions and it really doesn’t look as though there is a light on at all, it just lightens the screen and heightens the contrast beautifully. There is some minor shading at the bottom where the LEDs are, but it is barely noticeable to me (I know some people are sensitive to this) and certainly didn’t detract from reading.

The new fonts are also beautiful. Normally, I don’t bother too much with fonts, concentrating more on the content than the packaging, but the new ones are simply stunning.

Although the Kindle Touch’s screen and contrast are also good, I’d compare this to reading a cheap mass market paperback (Touch) compared to a high quality hardback (Kindle Paperwhite).

I use my ereader on a daily basis, so this is a worthwhile upgrade for me, and if you were to upgrade, I’m sure you wouldn’t be disappointed.

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