Category: Miscellaneous

Guest Post by Azrael from Joe Donahue’s Final Requiem

Hello, my name is Azrael. I am an archdemon and easily the most powerful character in a novel called “The Final Requiem.” You probably have not heard about the novel yet, and that is perfectly fine. The novel has not been published yet. The creator of my world, Joe Donahue, is looking to try to self publish the novel sometime in the next couple weeks. It is turning out to be a very exciting and stressful time for him.

It is turning out to be a very monotonous and boring time for me. He has been having me write a constant stream of these things he calls guest blogs so that you mortals can read them. It essentially amounts to me writing what I think about the book in the hopes that people will read it. Sometimes, if it is not for a blog that typically does book reviews, it will be me talking about whatever that blog usually talks about. The end result is always hoping that it will lead more people to read the book.

Personally, I think the fact that the book gives people the opportunity to bask in the brilliance that is me should be enough reason for people to read the book, but I guess Mr. Donahue wants me to do more so here I am. The topic of the book is the ongoing war that has been raging on between angels and demons in my world. It all goes back to when sin first came into being. That one, great moment, created gates between Hell and Earth. These gates have allowed us demons to be able to travel to Earth in our spirit form ever since.

We’re unable to take our physical form because the main gate between Hell and Earth is closed, for now. The presence of demons in spirit form, however, also permeated the world in dark magic that prevented the angels from taking their physical form as well. Well, we started doing what demons do best and used our cunning to find ways to interact with children in their dreams. Why else would you think an infant would have a nightmare without having knowledge of the world? We demons don’t get credit for the resourcefulness that we are truly capable of. Well, the angels did not like our direct interference in the slightest. Every time we assigned a demon to corrupt a child they would assign an angel to protect that child.

That leads us to the beginning of the story that Mr. Donahue has so excellently orchestrated, and I say that because he included me in it. Although it is not bloody likely that he could have told this story without including me. We demons became tired of not being able to take our physical form, so we chose a boy named Antonius to be our chosen one and told him he would be the one that would assist in opening the main gate between Hell and Earth and once and for all make it where we could take our physical form.

The angels chose a sniveling wretch of a human named Michael to be their chosen one. I will honestly never understand why Joe Donahue picked that vomitus mass to be the protagonist. The angels try to use Michael to close every single demon gate between Hell and Earth, removing the demonic presence and making it where angels can once again take their physical form on Earth. Oh what a joyous and happy ending that would be for them wouldn’t it?

Well, I hope this guest blog has given you some interest in reading the book that I take part in, “The Final Requiem.” The angels have their chosen one and are trying to close all of the gates and we have our chosen one and are trying to open the main gate. The only way for you mortals to find out what happens is for you to read the book once it is published. It should be available on CreateSpace and Kindle sometime in the next few weeks.

I would also like to thank the mortal that has given me the opportunity to post this guest blog here. It is much appreciated. If you enjoy this blog then you should take the time to read their blogs, their other guest blogs and the book reviews that inhabit this site.

All updates about the pending release of “The Final Requiem” will be placed on http://joebrewing.wordpress.com and on Twitter @JoeBrewing. Watch both of those locations regularly to find out when it will be available for download.

Guest Post by Azrael from Joe Donahue’s Final Requiem

Hello, my name is Azrael. I am an archdemon and easily the most powerful character in a novel called “The Final Requiem.” You probably have not heard about the novel yet, and that is perfectly fine. The novel has not been published yet. The creator of my world, Joe Donahue, is looking to try to self publish the novel sometime in the next couple weeks. It is turning out to be a very exciting and stressful time for him.

It is turning out to be a very monotonous and boring time for me. He has been having me write a constant stream of these things he calls guest blogs so that you mortals can read them. It essentially amounts to me writing what I think about the book in the hopes that people will read it. Sometimes, if it is not for a blog that typically does book reviews, it will be me talking about whatever that blog usually talks about. The end result is always hoping that it will lead more people to read the book.

Personally, I think the fact that the book gives people the opportunity to bask in the brilliance that is me should be enough reason for people to read the book, but I guess Mr. Donahue wants me to do more so here I am. The topic of the book is the ongoing war that has been raging on between angels and demons in my world. It all goes back to when sin first came into being. That one, great moment, created gates between Hell and Earth. These gates have allowed us demons to be able to travel to Earth in our spirit form ever since.

We’re unable to take our physical form because the main gate between Hell and Earth is closed, for now. The presence of demons in spirit form, however, also permeated the world in dark magic that prevented the angels from taking their physical form as well. Well, we started doing what demons do best and used our cunning to find ways to interact with children in their dreams. Why else would you think an infant would have a nightmare without having knowledge of the world? We demons don’t get credit for the resourcefulness that we are truly capable of. Well, the angels did not like our direct interference in the slightest. Every time we assigned a demon to corrupt a child they would assign an angel to protect that child.

That leads us to the beginning of the story that Mr. Donahue has so excellently orchestrated, and I say that because he included me in it. Although it is not bloody likely that he could have told this story without including me. We demons became tired of not being able to take our physical form, so we chose a boy named Antonius to be our chosen one and told him he would be the one that would assist in opening the main gate between Hell and Earth and once and for all make it where we could take our physical form.

The angels chose a sniveling wretch of a human named Michael to be their chosen one. I will honestly never understand why Joe Donahue picked that vomitus mass to be the protagonist. The angels try to use Michael to close every single demon gate between Hell and Earth, removing the demonic presence and making it where angels can once again take their physical form on Earth. Oh what a joyous and happy ending that would be for them wouldn’t it?

Well, I hope this guest blog has given you some interest in reading the book that I take part in, “The Final Requiem.” The angels have their chosen one and are trying to close all of the gates and we have our chosen one and are trying to open the main gate. The only way for you mortals to find out what happens is for you to read the book once it is published. It should be available on CreateSpace and Kindle sometime in the next few weeks.

I would also like to thank the mortal that has given me the opportunity to post this guest blog here. It is much appreciated. If you enjoy this blog then you should take the time to read their blogs, their other guest blogs and the book reviews that inhabit this site.

All updates about the pending release of “The Final Requiem” will be placed on http://joebrewing.wordpress.com and on Twitter @JoeBrewing. Watch both of those locations regularly to find out when it will be available for download.

Bookshelf Scavenger Hunt

I recently came across a fun thing to do – a Bookshelf Scavenger Hunt.  This was something created by BookTuber The Library of Sarah, and here’s her introductory video.  My bookshelf is more virtual, but it sounds such an interesting idea, I thought I’d give it a go.  So without further ado, let’s get started:

Find an author’s name or title with the letter Z in it
My bookshelf contains both ebooks and audiobooks.  For this one I chose the audiobook of Nine Princes in Amber by Roger Zelazny.  This is a fun series – each time you think you’ve got to the heart of the matter, another layer is pulled away.

Find a classic
This one’s easy.  Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.  A classic if ever there was one.

Find a book with a key on it
I struggled with this one for a bit.  I was even going to suggest the Wheel of Time’s Winter’s Heart which depicts Rand working with the Choedan Kal which is the access key to huge amounts of the One Power.  However, I thought that was stretching it somewhat.  Eventually I found this:

Find something on your bookshelf that’s not a book
As my bookshelf is virtual, I’ll have to pass on this one.

Find the oldest book on your shelf
This I will interpret as being the book which was originally published earliest.  For me that would probably be Evelina by Fanny Burney originally published in 1778,  I’ve not read this one yet.

Find a book with a girl on the cover
I’m spoiled for choice here.  It’s amazing how many young adult fantasy books have a girl on the cover.  As I’m on a Cassandra Clare kick right now though, I’ll go with Clockwork Princess.

Find a book that has an animal in it
I have a soft spot for gentle mysteries in which the protagonist’s cat helps to solve it.  For this let’s go with File M for Murder by Miranda James in which librarian Charlie is ably aided and abetted in his sleuthing by his Maine Coon cat, Diesel.

Find a book with a male protagonist
Two words.  Harry Potter.

Find a book with only words on it
This was surprisingly difficult.  It’s amazing how much cover art is part of the book experience.  The closest one I have is probably Mr Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan.  This is an excellent book, by the way, and worth checking out.


Find a book with illustrations in it
Hmmm.  Let’s go with Harry Potter Page to Screen.  This is a simply gorgeous book of how the Harry Potter films were made.  It was a gift from my husband and definitely one book I’m happy to have in beautiful hardback.

Find a book with gold lettering
Gold seems to be a popular choice for lettering.  Let’s go with The Gathering Storm from Wheel of Time

Find a diary (true or fictional)
I was torn between The Diary of Anne Frank and The Bridget Jones Diary.  Both are excellent books for very, very different reasons.  As the sequel to Bridget Jones is coming out in a few months, let’s go with Bridget.

Find a book written by someone with a common name (like Smith)
I assume “Dan Brown” counts?

Find a book that has a closeup of something on it
Shatter Me by Taheri Mafi is a new addition to my library.  I’ve not read it yet, but I’m hearing excellent things about it.  The cover shows a closeup of an eye


Find a book on your shelf that takes place in the earliest time period
Without a doubt, this would have to be Jean M. Auel’s Earth’s Children series, which is set in the Ice Age.  I enjoyed the first couple of books, but after that I found they got bogged down somewhat.

Find a hardcover book without a jacket
My virtual books all have virtual dust jackets

Find a teal/turquoise colored book
One thing I love about my virtual library is that it can be sorted at the click of a button.  One of the sort options Delicious Library has is to sort by cover colour.  This helped me to find this:

Find a book with stars on it
How about The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.  This was an interesting concept, but failed slightly in the execution.

Find a non-YA book
I borrowed 50 Shades of Grey from the library, so cannot say it’s on my bookshelf, even if I would admit to it.  Of the books in my library, I’d say the least YA friendly would be possibly The Time Keeper by Mitch Alborn.  While I’m sure young adults could read and enjoy it, I’d say a few more years of life experience would help in the appreciation of the themes explored.

There you have it.  Thank you, Sarah, for coming up with a fun and imaginative exercise.  I enjoyed the fact that it showed how varied my library is.  What would you scavenge from your bookshelf?  Let me know in the comments.

Bookshelf Scavenger Hunt

I recently came across a fun thing to do – a Bookshelf Scavenger Hunt.  This was something created by BookTuber The Library of Sarah, and here’s her introductory video.  My bookshelf is more virtual, but it sounds such an interesting idea, I thought I’d give it a go.  So without further ado, let’s get started:

Find an author’s name or title with the letter Z in it
My bookshelf contains both ebooks and audiobooks.  For this one I chose the audiobook of Nine Princes in Amber by Roger Zelazny.  This is a fun series – each time you think you’ve got to the heart of the matter, another layer is pulled away.

Find a classic
This one’s easy.  Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.  A classic if ever there was one.

Find a book with a key on it
I struggled with this one for a bit.  I was even going to suggest the Wheel of Time’s Winter’s Heart which depicts Rand working with the Choedan Kal which is the access key to huge amounts of the One Power.  However, I thought that was stretching it somewhat.  Eventually I found this:

Find something on your bookshelf that’s not a book
As my bookshelf is virtual, I’ll have to pass on this one.

Find the oldest book on your shelf
This I will interpret as being the book which was originally published earliest.  For me that would probably be Evelina by Fanny Burney originally published in 1778,  I’ve not read this one yet.

Find a book with a girl on the cover
I’m spoiled for choice here.  It’s amazing how many young adult fantasy books have a girl on the cover.  As I’m on a Cassandra Clare kick right now though, I’ll go with Clockwork Princess.

Find a book that has an animal in it
I have a soft spot for gentle mysteries in which the protagonist’s cat helps to solve it.  For this let’s go with File M for Murder by Miranda James in which librarian Charlie is ably aided and abetted in his sleuthing by his Maine Coon cat, Diesel.

Find a book with a male protagonist
Two words.  Harry Potter.

Find a book with only words on it
This was surprisingly difficult.  It’s amazing how much cover art is part of the book experience.  The closest one I have is probably Mr Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan.  This is an excellent book, by the way, and worth checking out.


Find a book with illustrations in it
Hmmm.  Let’s go with Harry Potter Page to Screen.  This is a simply gorgeous book of how the Harry Potter films were made.  It was a gift from my husband and definitely one book I’m happy to have in beautiful hardback.

Find a book with gold lettering
Gold seems to be a popular choice for lettering.  Let’s go with The Gathering Storm from Wheel of Time

Find a diary (true or fictional)
I was torn between The Diary of Anne Frank and The Bridget Jones Diary.  Both are excellent books for very, very different reasons.  As the sequel to Bridget Jones is coming out in a few months, let’s go with Bridget.

Find a book written by someone with a common name (like Smith)
I assume “Dan Brown” counts?

Find a book that has a closeup of something on it
Shatter Me by Taheri Mafi is a new addition to my library.  I’ve not read it yet, but I’m hearing excellent things about it.  The cover shows a closeup of an eye


Find a book on your shelf that takes place in the earliest time period
Without a doubt, this would have to be Jean M. Auel’s Earth’s Children series, which is set in the Ice Age.  I enjoyed the first couple of books, but after that I found they got bogged down somewhat.

Find a hardcover book without a jacket
My virtual books all have virtual dust jackets

Find a teal/turquoise colored book
One thing I love about my virtual library is that it can be sorted at the click of a button.  One of the sort options Delicious Library has is to sort by cover colour.  This helped me to find this:

Find a book with stars on it
How about The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.  This was an interesting concept, but failed slightly in the execution.

Find a non-YA book
I borrowed 50 Shades of Grey from the library, so cannot say it’s on my bookshelf, even if I would admit to it.  Of the books in my library, I’d say the least YA friendly would be possibly The Time Keeper by Mitch Alborn.  While I’m sure young adults could read and enjoy it, I’d say a few more years of life experience would help in the appreciation of the themes explored.

There you have it.  Thank you, Sarah, for coming up with a fun and imaginative exercise.  I enjoyed the fact that it showed how varied my library is.  What would you scavenge from your bookshelf?  Let me know in the comments.

Audible and Kindle – A Match Made in Heaven

Get 1 free audiobook credit at audible.com!

As many of my regular readers will know, I am a big fan of both ebooks and audiobooks.  For those of you unsure about e-reading or looking to take the first step, take a look at my Newbie’s Guide to eReading.  If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them.

For my audiobook needs I go to Audible.  Here’s how it works.  You can either buy audiobooks at full price, with no membership or monthly commitment.  An average audiobook, say for example The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith aka JK Rowling, costs around $25 USD for non members.  A larger book, like say Fires of Heaven from the Wheel of Time may be as much as $60 USD, but most are in the $25 USD range.

Alternatively, you can choose to take a membership with Audible.  The basic plan $14.95 USD per month which gives you one credit per month to use on any audiobook.  An ideal introduction to Audible.  The Platinum plan, which I have, is two credits to spend on books a month.  That costs $22.95 USD per month.  They also have an Annual plan for which you pay $149.50 USD for 12 credits or $229.50 USD for 24.  Try Audible Now and Get A FREE Audiobook.  Monthly memberships also entitle you to substantial discounts on a la carte audiobooks over and above your one or two a month.

I understand that many of you may be reluctant to sign up for a monthly plan.  With Audible there is no term commitment.  You are free to cancel your membership at any time with no additional charges.  Audible is part of the Amazon family, which means outstanding customer service.  I can personally confirm that cancelling a membership is no problem.  I did that at one point before I became addicted to audiobooks.  If memory serves, they offered me a deal where I paid something like $10 or $20 a year, got no credits, but retained my membership discount on a la carte audiobooks, but I could just as easily have cancelled.

As I mentioned, Audible is part of the Amazon group of companies which allows it to offer the totally awesome Whispersync for Voice.  This is where the Kindle ebook and Audible are bundled together and your place is synced across all devices both for reading and listening.  You do have to buy the two separately, but the Audible audiobook is offered at a substantial discount, usually for $3.99 – $12.99 USD.  With Whispersync for Voice I might listen to a chapter or two on my iPhone during my commute, read on my Kindle during my lunch hour, switch back to Audible to travel back home and I never need to worry about keeping my place no matter what medium I’m enjoying – Amazon and Audible do all that for you.  Not every audiobook or Kindle book is setup for Whispersync for Voice, but a significant number are, and it’s growing.

You can see what I mean by looking at my Audible library:

Audible ws library

You can see that under the eBook companion column, Knife of Dreams has Whispersync for Voice enabled.

Ws 2

Here you can see that I have the audiobook for The Count of Monte Cristo and as I don’t yet own the matching Kindle ebook it is prompting me to purchase it.

If you’re in the US, Amazon makes it super easy for you to get setup with Whispersync for Voice.  If a Kindle book is compatible it will have the words Whispersync for Voice: Ready right at the top of the book details.  Once you’ve purchased it, you will be asked if you want to purchase the matching Audible audiobook at a reduced cost and passed through to Audible.   Conversely, if you’ve bought the Audible book first, clicking on the Buy Matching Kindle Book link will take you to Amazon where you can buy the book at a reduced price.  For example, for Kushiel’s Dart I would be offered the Kindle book at $5.99 instead of the $10.25 it would normally cost.

If you have a Kindle Fire, it’s even easier.  When buying a Kindle book you will be prompted to Add Professional Narration for between $3.99 USD and $12.99 USD.  You can then access Immersion Reading where you can follow along on the Kindle and the text will be highlighted as the audio narration progresses.

For those of us not in the US, it is a little trickier.  Whispersync for Voice isn’t advertised nearly as well as for our US cousins.  For example in the Canadian store, the one I use, the Whispersync for Voice: Ready is not highlighted in the description.  Searching for Whispersync for Voice doesn’t bring any results unlike in the US Store.  However, it does work;  you just need to be a little more creative.

Here’s how I’ve found it working for me.  I go to Audible first and search for the book in which I’m interested.  Let’s take Knife of Dreams as an example.

Kod

You see that Whispersync for Voice-ready is highlighted in red, so this book is enabled for the service.  You will see that it is showing the normal member price of $39.15.  Don’t buy the Audible book yet!  Next, I go to the Canadian Kindle store and search for the book

KoD2

Whispersync for Voice is not mentioned anywhere, so you need to take the chance and hope it’s the right version.  Once you’ve bought the Kindle book, head on back to Audible where you’ll see something like this (using The Cuckoo’s Calling  as an example here):

Cuckoo

You will see that you are now being offered the Audible book at a reduced price – $12.99 USD instead of $17.18 USD – because you own the Kindle ebook.  Buy it and you’re all set up for Whispersync for Voice.  Enjoy! I understand Audible hopes to integrate more fully for those of us in Canada at some point, but not quite yet.  I look forward to it.

If you’re interested in trying it out, check out Audible’s Whispersync for Voice information page. It will help you get setup with a classic novel to help you try it out.  I can thoroughly recommend it.

If you have any questions on Audible or about Whispersync for Voice please let me know in the comments and I’ll do my best to help out.

Audible and Kindle – A Match Made in Heaven

Get 1 free audiobook credit at audible.com!

As many of my regular readers will know, I am a big fan of both ebooks and audiobooks.  For those of you unsure about e-reading or looking to take the first step, take a look at my Newbie’s Guide to eReading.  If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them.

For my audiobook needs I go to Audible.  Here’s how it works.  You can either buy audiobooks at full price, with no membership or monthly commitment.  An average audiobook, say for example The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith aka JK Rowling, costs around $25 USD for non members.  A larger book, like say Fires of Heaven from the Wheel of Time may be as much as $60 USD, but most are in the $25 USD range.

Alternatively, you can choose to take a membership with Audible.  The basic plan $14.95 USD per month which gives you one credit per month to use on any audiobook.  An ideal introduction to Audible.  The Platinum plan, which I have, is two credits to spend on books a month.  That costs $22.95 USD per month.  They also have an Annual plan for which you pay $149.50 USD for 12 credits or $229.50 USD for 24.  Try Audible Now and Get A FREE Audiobook.  Monthly memberships also entitle you to substantial discounts on a la carte audiobooks over and above your one or two a month.

I understand that many of you may be reluctant to sign up for a monthly plan.  With Audible there is no term commitment.  You are free to cancel your membership at any time with no additional charges.  Audible is part of the Amazon family, which means outstanding customer service.  I can personally confirm that cancelling a membership is no problem.  I did that at one point before I became addicted to audiobooks.  If memory serves, they offered me a deal where I paid something like $10 or $20 a year, got no credits, but retained my membership discount on a la carte audiobooks, but I could just as easily have cancelled.

As I mentioned, Audible is part of the Amazon group of companies which allows it to offer the totally awesome Whispersync for Voice.  This is where the Kindle ebook and Audible are bundled together and your place is synced across all devices both for reading and listening.  You do have to buy the two separately, but the Audible audiobook is offered at a substantial discount, usually for $3.99 – $12.99 USD.  With Whispersync for Voice I might listen to a chapter or two on my iPhone during my commute, read on my Kindle during my lunch hour, switch back to Audible to travel back home and I never need to worry about keeping my place no matter what medium I’m enjoying – Amazon and Audible do all that for you.  Not every audiobook or Kindle book is setup for Whispersync for Voice, but a significant number are, and it’s growing.

You can see what I mean by looking at my Audible library:

Audible ws library

You can see that under the eBook companion column, Knife of Dreams has Whispersync for Voice enabled.

Ws 2

Here you can see that I have the audiobook for The Count of Monte Cristo and as I don’t yet own the matching Kindle ebook it is prompting me to purchase it.

If you’re in the US, Amazon makes it super easy for you to get setup with Whispersync for Voice.  If a Kindle book is compatible it will have the words Whispersync for Voice: Ready right at the top of the book details.  Once you’ve purchased it, you will be asked if you want to purchase the matching Audible audiobook at a reduced cost and passed through to Audible.   Conversely, if you’ve bought the Audible book first, clicking on the Buy Matching Kindle Book link will take you to Amazon where you can buy the book at a reduced price.  For example, for Kushiel’s Dart I would be offered the Kindle book at $5.99 instead of the $10.25 it would normally cost.

If you have a Kindle Fire, it’s even easier.  When buying a Kindle book you will be prompted to Add Professional Narration for between $3.99 USD and $12.99 USD.  You can then access Immersion Reading where you can follow along on the Kindle and the text will be highlighted as the audio narration progresses.

For those of us not in the US, it is a little trickier.  Whispersync for Voice isn’t advertised nearly as well as for our US cousins.  For example in the Canadian store, the one I use, the Whispersync for Voice: Ready is not highlighted in the description.  Searching for Whispersync for Voice doesn’t bring any results unlike in the US Store.  However, it does work;  you just need to be a little more creative.

Here’s how I’ve found it working for me.  I go to Audible first and search for the book in which I’m interested.  Let’s take Knife of Dreams as an example.

Kod

You see that Whispersync for Voice-ready is highlighted in red, so this book is enabled for the service.  You will see that it is showing the normal member price of $39.15.  Don’t buy the Audible book yet!  Next, I go to the Canadian Kindle store and search for the book

KoD2

Whispersync for Voice is not mentioned anywhere, so you need to take the chance and hope it’s the right version.  Once you’ve bought the Kindle book, head on back to Audible where you’ll see something like this (using The Cuckoo’s Calling  as an example here):

Cuckoo

You will see that you are now being offered the Audible book at a reduced price – $12.99 USD instead of $17.18 USD – because you own the Kindle ebook.  Buy it and you’re all set up for Whispersync for Voice.  Enjoy! I understand Audible hopes to integrate more fully for those of us in Canada at some point, but not quite yet.  I look forward to it.

If you’re interested in trying it out, check out Audible’s Whispersync for Voice information page. It will help you get setup with a classic novel to help you try it out.  I can thoroughly recommend it.

If you have any questions on Audible or about Whispersync for Voice please let me know in the comments and I’ll do my best to help out.

Delicious Library and My Out-of-Control TBR List

Recently, I spent a fun couple of days putting together a digital bookshelf of all my books with Delicious Library (Mac OS X only).   I particularly appreciated being able to view my Kindle and Kobo ebooks, physical hard copy books (of which I still have a few) and Audible audiobooks all in the one place.  The software includes a barcode scanner, so you can scan in and add physical hard copy books.  Audible audiobooks and iBooks are added via iTunes and I used a drop and drag from the Amazon Manage Your Kindle page to add my Kindle collection.  I had to manually search for and add my Kobo books.  I should note that Digital Library has full iTunes integration so it also includes your iTunes movies and TV shows.  It took me a little while to work out how to include Audible and ebooks on the same shelf – but a quick Google search indicated that I needed to edit my shelf to include both “iTunes Audiobook” and “book” type content.  

Delicious Library can also generate fascinating stats about your library.  For example, I learned that to listen to my entire Audible collection back to back would take me 1,756 hours and 34 minutes!  It would cost me $770 to replace my few hard copy books – the software assumes a zero replacement value for Audible and ebooks and iTunes content as they are stored in the Cloud – and David Eddings is actually my top author, closely followed by Robert Jordan.

Being a collector of predominantly ebooks and Audible audiobooks, I really miss being able to display all those beautiful books on a physical bookshelf.  Of course, Delicious Library cannot quite replicate this, but it comes pretty close.  The display is simply beautiful and the books react when you mouse over them.  Content is linked to Amazon, so you can see immediately details about the books.  I did have to spend some time editing the data slightly so that my series would display in the correct order, but the nice thing is, my bookshelf will now never be out of order.

Reviewing my library in this way brought home my attention to several things; one, the Amazon one-click buy now is DANGEROUS and my TBR list is completely out of control.  Like many bookworms, I am a bit of an impulse buyer and I have so many excellent books waiting on my shelf to be read that I don’t get round to reading before I buy the next one.  So, I have put together a TBR list and will commit to not buying any more books until I have made good headway through it.  I will make some exceptions; I may read the books I have already on pre-order (the ones coming out in August have already been added to the list) and when book 12 of Anne Robillard’s Chevaliers d’Emeraude is available on Kobo I will buy it.  Also, any free books I’m offered to review will be added. My Audible credits may also be used as I wish, although I imagine I will use them to pick up Audible versions of books already in my TBR or to add to Audible series I already enjoy (Dresden Files, Artemis Fowl and Iron Druid).  I have four weeks of nightshift work coming up in a week or two, and I particularly appreciate Audible books to get me through.  Wish me luck with this!

Delicious Library and My Out-of-Control TBR List

Recently, I spent a fun couple of days putting together a digital bookshelf of all my books with Delicious Library (Mac OS X only).   I particularly appreciated being able to view my Kindle and Kobo ebooks, physical hard copy books (of which I still have a few) and Audible audiobooks all in the one place.  The software includes a barcode scanner, so you can scan in and add physical hard copy books.  Audible audiobooks and iBooks are added via iTunes and I used a drop and drag from the Amazon Manage Your Kindle page to add my Kindle collection.  I had to manually search for and add my Kobo books.  I should note that Digital Library has full iTunes integration so it also includes your iTunes movies and TV shows.  It took me a little while to work out how to include Audible and ebooks on the same shelf – but a quick Google search indicated that I needed to edit my shelf to include both “iTunes Audiobook” and “book” type content.  

Delicious Library can also generate fascinating stats about your library.  For example, I learned that to listen to my entire Audible collection back to back would take me 1,756 hours and 34 minutes!  It would cost me $770 to replace my few hard copy books – the software assumes a zero replacement value for Audible and ebooks and iTunes content as they are stored in the Cloud – and David Eddings is actually my top author, closely followed by Robert Jordan.

Being a collector of predominantly ebooks and Audible audiobooks, I really miss being able to display all those beautiful books on a physical bookshelf.  Of course, Delicious Library cannot quite replicate this, but it comes pretty close.  The display is simply beautiful and the books react when you mouse over them.  Content is linked to Amazon, so you can see immediately details about the books.  I did have to spend some time editing the data slightly so that my series would display in the correct order, but the nice thing is, my bookshelf will now never be out of order.

Reviewing my library in this way brought home my attention to several things; one, the Amazon one-click buy now is DANGEROUS and my TBR list is completely out of control.  Like many bookworms, I am a bit of an impulse buyer and I have so many excellent books waiting on my shelf to be read that I don’t get round to reading before I buy the next one.  So, I have put together a TBR list and will commit to not buying any more books until I have made good headway through it.  I will make some exceptions; I may read the books I have already on pre-order (the ones coming out in August have already been added to the list) and when book 12 of Anne Robillard’s Chevaliers d’Emeraude is available on Kobo I will buy it.  Also, any free books I’m offered to review will be added. My Audible credits may also be used as I wish, although I imagine I will use them to pick up Audible versions of books already in my TBR or to add to Audible series I already enjoy (Dresden Files, Artemis Fowl and Iron Druid).  I have four weeks of nightshift work coming up in a week or two, and I particularly appreciate Audible books to get me through.  Wish me luck with this!

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